Roofing 101

roofing 101

When replacing an old roof or building a home from scratch, it is important to understand the roofing jargon that to you may simply sound like something from a 007, or science fiction movie. In Roofing 101 we explain the basics of roofing shapes, materials, and vocabulary so that you can make the most informed decision when diving into any roofing project: whether repair or new roofing.

Roofing 101: Shapes

  • Gable
  • Hip
  • Mansard
  • Gambrel
  • Shed

Roofing 101: Materials

Asphalt Shingles: With more than 75% of all homes being built with asphalt shingles, these shingles are the most commonly used material in the United States. And for good reason, considering they are the least expensive option, and provide for the easiest installation.  Although their lifespan isn’t the best, they should last 15 to 30 years. Asphalt shingles are available in two types: organic and fiberglass.

Tile Roofs: Concrete and clay tiles are manufactured in a vast variety of colors, to compliment most any Mediterranean, European, Mission, and contemporary or ranch-style home. Tile roofs have the longest life expectancy of any other roofing material. Centuries old tile roofs are still enduring today. Tile roofs are built to withstand most anything Mother Nature throws at them and are Class A fire resistant.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs can be manufactured using a variety of materials, including copper, aluminum and stainless steel. They are commonly seen on bungalow, ranch, contemporary, and cottage style homes. Highly durable, and resistant to adverse weather, metal roofs are expected to last 50 years or more. Metal roofs are also endlessly recyclable; making them a viable choice for eco-friendly homeowners.

Roofing 101: Vocabulary

Coverage: The degree of weather protection offered by a roofing material: single, double or triple coverage.

Cricket: A built-up barrier to divert runoff around a chimney or at a transitional area.

Decking/Sheathing: The surface, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), to which roofing materials are applied.

Dormer: A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.

Drip Edge: L-shaped pieces of metal installed around the perimeter of a house to help prevent water from dripping behind the fascia boards or cap.

Eaves: Parts of a roof that project beyond or overhang the face at the lower edge of a sloped roof.

Exposure: Specifically, exposure to weather: the distance from the butt edge of one shingle to another.

Fascia: A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.

Fasteners: What holds the roofing material on top of the house (nails or screws).

Felt/Underlayment: A sheet of asphalt-saturated materials (often called tar paper) used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Fire Rating: System for classifying the fire resistances of various materials. Roofing materials are rated Class A, B or C. Class A materials, such as tile, have the highest resistance to fire originating outside the structure.

Flashing: Usually metal, this material is installed to prevent the infiltration of water into a transition, such as around chimneys and pipes.

Louvers: Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit (the underside of eaves) to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture. OSB: roof deck panels (4 feet by 8 feet) made of narrow bits of wood, installed lengthwise and crosswise in layers, and held together with a resin glue.

Peak: The very top area of the roof, usually covered with a ridge vet or ridge cap.

Penetrations: Objects that penetrate the roof’s deck, such as vents, pipes and chimneys.

Rake: The inclined edge of a pitched roof over an end wall.

Ridge Vent: A vent that runs the entire length of the roof, allowing air to escape.

Square: The amount of roofing material required to cover 10 square feet of roof surface.

Soffits: The finished underside of a sloped roof.

Transitions: Areas of the roof where the pitch/slope or angle changes.

Valley: An internal angle or water runway formed by the intersection of two slopes in a roof.

New Roofs Are The Best Roofs

Are you thinking about having a new roof installed, but are not sure if it’s worth the time or money? Well, getting a new roof installed is definitely a smart idea. Your roof is one of the most important parts of your home because it helps protect the inside from dirt, snow, wind, rain and other environmental factors. It is also relatively inexpensive to install a new roof. Here are the benefits of getting a new roof:

It Raises the Value of Your Home

A new rooftop will certainly raise the value of your home. It is one of the first aspects of your home seen by potential buyers, so it is important for it to look good. Potential buyers will see your home as newer and nicer with new shingles and a new gutter system installed.

It Will Reduce Frequency of Repairs

With a new roof, you can avoid costly roof repairs for some time. In fact, you likely will not have the need for a single repair for at least several years. In the long run, a new roof can save over constant repairs.

It Will Lower Your Energy Bill

If your roof is old and deteriorating, air can escape your home, which will cause your air conditioning to work harder. A new roof can eliminate this creating a more energy efficient living environment.

It Will Be Safer for Your Family Members

Some older roofs can actually be health hazards. Worn roof in need of new shingles and/or gutters can endanger your family’s health. Bacteria and mold has been known to grown in these old roofs, leading to potential allergy and respiratory problems.

As you can see, getting a new roof is completely worth the money. When you have a new roof installed by Jenesis Roofing, you will have the peace of mind of safety, comfort, and efficiency.

Common Problems With Old & Unmaintained Roofs

It sits on top of every building in the Denver area but we hardly ever think twice about it even though it is one of the most important parts of your home. It goes unnoticed so much that we tend to forget it’s even there. However, when problems arise it can be one of the most expensive repairs we need and there is no getting around it. As tough as the it is, it is still susceptible to damage and decay so it’s important to keep it maintained and in good health. We are referring to, of course, the roof.

Roof and Shingle Repair

Damage to your roof can cause the price of repairs to skyrocket and the value of your home to plummet. It’s important to know what signs to look for and what can be done to prevent future damage and repair current damage, restoring the life and value of your home. Some of the most common problems we encounter are:

Missing Or Damaged Shingles
Shingles are the overlapping pieces of material that cover your roof and protect it from the weather. When they get damaged or go missing, it leaves your home vulnerable to mildew and decay. The water from a storm can seep into your attic, down through your walls, and cause a multitude of problems like mold infestation. If it looks like your shingles might be cracked, balding, or missing, then it may be time to replace them.

Clogged Gutters
The gutters along the side of your home collect water and transport it to the ground, protecting your fascia boards and siding. When gutters get clogged, the water has nowhere else to go and can leak underneath your shingles and into the walls. Proper gutter maintenance is essential to the overall health of your home. Sometimes a proper cleaning will do the trick but if your gutters have been there for longer than you can remember, it may be time to think about getting new ones.

Cracks
The Denver area sees all sorts of weather and it can be detrimental to the health of your home. Over the years, the fluctuations in temperatures can weaken the wood, allowing it to crack and rain to leak into your home. Once that happens, the repair bills can add up quickly. Cracks can also leave your home susceptible to our next danger…

Weathered Roofing Shingle

Termite Infestation
These little creatures can wreak havoc on your home and do considerable damage to the wood and overall integrity of your roof. They eat a lot, reproduce quickly, and can spell danger in big, bold letters. They can sneak in under loose shingles or cracks and set up shop in the walls where there is ample food supply. With them, they carry all sorts of nasty germs. From the health of your family to the health of your home, a termite infestation can be extremely serious.

Are you looking to move to or within the Denver area soon? Have you picked out that perfect house and the only thing stopping you from moving in is making sure that is going to hold up to the weather? Are you already living in your home but starting to see signs that something might be a little bit out of the ordinary?

Jenesis Roofing has proudly served the Denver area for over 12 years and is a member of the BBB. Give us a call to set up an appointment for your free estimate. You’ll be glad you did!

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