Roofing 101

roofing 101

When replacing an old roof or building a home from scratch, it is important to understand the roofing jargon that to you may simply sound like something from a 007, or science fiction movie. In Roofing 101 we explain the basics of roofing shapes, materials, and vocabulary so that you can make the most informed decision when diving into any roofing project: whether repair or new roofing.

Roofing 101: Shapes

  • Gable
  • Hip
  • Mansard
  • Gambrel
  • Shed

Roofing 101: Materials

Asphalt Shingles: With more than 75% of all homes being built with asphalt shingles, these shingles are the most commonly used material in the United States. And for good reason, considering they are the least expensive option, and provide for the easiest installation.  Although their lifespan isn’t the best, they should last 15 to 30 years. Asphalt shingles are available in two types: organic and fiberglass.

Tile Roofs: Concrete and clay tiles are manufactured in a vast variety of colors, to compliment most any Mediterranean, European, Mission, and contemporary or ranch-style home. Tile roofs have the longest life expectancy of any other roofing material. Centuries old tile roofs are still enduring today. Tile roofs are built to withstand most anything Mother Nature throws at them and are Class A fire resistant.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs can be manufactured using a variety of materials, including copper, aluminum and stainless steel. They are commonly seen on bungalow, ranch, contemporary, and cottage style homes. Highly durable, and resistant to adverse weather, metal roofs are expected to last 50 years or more. Metal roofs are also endlessly recyclable; making them a viable choice for eco-friendly homeowners.

Roofing 101: Vocabulary

Coverage: The degree of weather protection offered by a roofing material: single, double or triple coverage.

Cricket: A built-up barrier to divert runoff around a chimney or at a transitional area.

Decking/Sheathing: The surface, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), to which roofing materials are applied.

Dormer: A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.

Drip Edge: L-shaped pieces of metal installed around the perimeter of a house to help prevent water from dripping behind the fascia boards or cap.

Eaves: Parts of a roof that project beyond or overhang the face at the lower edge of a sloped roof.

Exposure: Specifically, exposure to weather: the distance from the butt edge of one shingle to another.

Fascia: A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.

Fasteners: What holds the roofing material on top of the house (nails or screws).

Felt/Underlayment: A sheet of asphalt-saturated materials (often called tar paper) used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Fire Rating: System for classifying the fire resistances of various materials. Roofing materials are rated Class A, B or C. Class A materials, such as tile, have the highest resistance to fire originating outside the structure.

Flashing: Usually metal, this material is installed to prevent the infiltration of water into a transition, such as around chimneys and pipes.

Louvers: Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit (the underside of eaves) to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture. OSB: roof deck panels (4 feet by 8 feet) made of narrow bits of wood, installed lengthwise and crosswise in layers, and held together with a resin glue.

Peak: The very top area of the roof, usually covered with a ridge vet or ridge cap.

Penetrations: Objects that penetrate the roof’s deck, such as vents, pipes and chimneys.

Rake: The inclined edge of a pitched roof over an end wall.

Ridge Vent: A vent that runs the entire length of the roof, allowing air to escape.

Square: The amount of roofing material required to cover 10 square feet of roof surface.

Soffits: The finished underside of a sloped roof.

Transitions: Areas of the roof where the pitch/slope or angle changes.

Valley: An internal angle or water runway formed by the intersection of two slopes in a roof.

Preventing Ice Damage

Denver Roofing | Roof Replacement

preventing ice damage

With the snow still falling, there are a few areas we want you to consider when it comes to caring for your roof – particularly for preventing ice damage.

The snow that has been sitting on your roof can melt due to the heat from inside your home. When this happens, the snow turns into liquid that can run down your roof and clog your gutters. The water then can find it’s way under your roof shingles and cause damage to occur inside your home.

A well-insulated roof will help prevent the heat from inside your home from escaping. This can  help eliminate how much of the snow fall, on your roof, is turned into liquid. We can help you with the process of choosing a new roof. A well-insulated and a well-installed roof can be the difference maker for preventing bigger future home repairs.

Our trained roofing technicians can give you a professional prospective on the best steps to take in order to get a new and beautiful roof. You can select from a diverse assortment of roofing styles and colors. We can work with your budget and taste! We specialize in new construction to storm damage repair work. Our Roofing Experts are eager to assist you in determining the best products to fulfill all of your roofing needs!

For more information…

Visit us at: JENESIS ROOFING

Or call us at: (303) 789-1505

 

 

Is It Time For a New Roof?

Leaky Roof?

The roof is perhaps one of the most important parts of your home and knowing when to repair it is important. Roofing repair can be costly, so knowing when to repair or replace the roof can be a big decision for a family. A roof can last anywhere from 15 to 40 or more years.

The following are a few tips and guidelines to follow when making the decision about roof repairs:

  • 1. Missing or Cracked Shingles – If you notice this problem, it may be a sign that the tar holding shingles in place has worn out. At this stage, roofing repair instead of replacement might be a feasible option.
  • 2. Damp Spots in the Attic or Ceiling – If visible water spots are in the attic, it might be a sign that it is time for a new roof. Damp areas can also mean that the roof is nearing the end of its life.
  • 3. Buckling Shingles – Buckling can mean that new shingles might have been applied over old ones or that there is poor roof ventilation.
  • 4. Rotting Roof – Roof rotting happens when the roof mat absorbs the moisture from the air and the shingles disintegrate. This problem happens more in southern states.

Gutters, too, play a role in making a decision about your roofing needs. Paying attention to your gutters can prevent small problems from becoming bigger. Damaged or improperly installed gutters can allow water to get under the roof and lead to significant damage.

New Roofs Are The Best Roofs

Are you thinking about having a new roof installed, but are not sure if it’s worth the time or money? Well, getting a new roof installed is definitely a smart idea. Your roof is one of the most important parts of your home because it helps protect the inside from dirt, snow, wind, rain and other environmental factors. It is also relatively inexpensive to install a new roof. Here are the benefits of getting a new roof:

It Raises the Value of Your Home

A new rooftop will certainly raise the value of your home. It is one of the first aspects of your home seen by potential buyers, so it is important for it to look good. Potential buyers will see your home as newer and nicer with new shingles and a new gutter system installed.

It Will Reduce Frequency of Repairs

With a new roof, you can avoid costly roof repairs for some time. In fact, you likely will not have the need for a single repair for at least several years. In the long run, a new roof can save over constant repairs.

It Will Lower Your Energy Bill

If your roof is old and deteriorating, air can escape your home, which will cause your air conditioning to work harder. A new roof can eliminate this creating a more energy efficient living environment.

It Will Be Safer for Your Family Members

Some older roofs can actually be health hazards. Worn roof in need of new shingles and/or gutters can endanger your family’s health. Bacteria and mold has been known to grown in these old roofs, leading to potential allergy and respiratory problems.

As you can see, getting a new roof is completely worth the money. When you have a new roof installed by Jenesis Roofing, you will have the peace of mind of safety, comfort, and efficiency.

Choosing A New Roof

 

Asphalt ShinglesAs most homeowners are well aware, there will come a time to replace the old, leaky roof with a new, reliable roof. Especially if the old one contained wood substances which have become worn-out over time. There are quite a few homeowners out there that do not take the time to properly assess their options. The results can often be disastrous and cause unnecessary problems that potentially could have been avoided. Many options are available for review, as it is vitally important to choose what will best fit the needs of your home. The decision made will ultimately depend on location, climate, age of the home, and of course, personal preference. All of these factors must be considered; including the cost of required materials and installation to decide which is best for you and your home.

There are several kinds of roofs to choose from, such as asphalt or composition shingles, tile, metal, cool, and flat roofs. Homeowners must take into account which of these options would be most beneficial to your home.

The asphalt and composition shingles would be ideal if the customer lives in an area where the weather stays relatively the same throughout the year. Asphalt is strong and durable year-round, where the traditional wood shingle-types could deteriorate over time.
Tile roofs are ideal for refracting the heat from the blazing sun off of your home. Tile also gives the home a more “stucco” and modern appearance.

Metal is becoming popular due to sustainability and endurance through severe weather. It has been proven that metal roofs are more durable and therefore lasts longer than any other type of roofing.

No matter what decision is made, there are a few services which are offered to insure safe installation and continuing maintenance. The services include hail, wind, storm, and flood restoration and repairs, as well as tree removal and tarp coverage. The experts at Jenesis Roofing are available now to assist you in making the right decision for your home.

Energy Efficient Roofing

Homes and businesses are starting to use energy-efficient roofing materials more and more. Unlike traditional materials, energy efficient styles absorb less heat. They are at least 50 percent cooler than regular roofs during the hottest points of the summer. They also reflect up to 65 percent more heat and sunlight. Traditional roofing materials only reflect up to 35 percent.

There are several benefits of using energy efficient materials. Because the heat is reflected away from the house, less energy is required to keep the home cool. When less energy is used, there is a decrease in the levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

Types of Energy Efficient Roofs

There are several types of energy efficient materials. They may be slightly more expensive than traditional. But, the amount of money saved on energy costs over time makes it worth the investment. Metal, tile, and solar shingles are some of the energy-efficient materials available for use.

Metal Roofs

Metal is known for being a durable material and one that can handle extreme weather conditions. It is also fire-proof and not insusceptible to damage by insects. Metal is a highly-reflective material that has the ability to reflect a tremendous amount of sunlight. Common metals used include Aluminum and steel.

Tile Roofing

Tile is a popular roofing material amongst homeowners. Concrete tile can withstand damage and any weather condition. This material also has aesthetic appeal as it comes in a variety of colors and styles. These tiles greatly reduce cooling costs.

Cool Roofs

A cool roof reflects the sun’s light and heat back up into the atmosphere. Light-colored reflective materials help the structure stay cooler. While white is a common color, other colors are also available. There are several benefits to having a cool roof. They prolong the life of air conditioners. Buildings without air conditioners may not even need them, or can use smaller units. From an economic standpoint, electricity bills will decrease.

TPO and EPDM

There are also energy saving options available for flat roofs. Thermo-plastic-olefin (TPO) is one option. This material is resistant to algae and ozone. The seams of this material are welded together to create a cohesive piece. TPO has the ability to keep a building cool naturally. Ethlyne Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) has been used since the 1960s. EPDM also reflects heat and is comprised of recyclable materials.

Many aspects of home and business construction are beginning to consider using materials that are more energy and eco-friendly. The roofing industry is no different. There are several different types of materials that can help building and home owners reduce their energy costs. Call Jenesis Roofing today for your free estimate!

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