Is It Time for Roof Replacement?

 

roof replacement

It is important to have a roof over your head. Yet as a busy homeowner, with an already hectic schedule, the last thing on your mind is roof maintenance. However, this oversight is a bit unfair, as your Denver roof withstands a lot of wear and tear – everything from heavy snow to pouring rain. Read on for more information on biannual roof inspections, roofing materials including asphalt shingles, and new roofs.

Roof Inspection: What to Look For

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) recommends that you inspect your roof at least two times a year – preferably in the spring and fall, as this will optimize your roofing systems’ life expectancy. Ensuring your roof is in good condition will also be a big plus should you ever decide to sell your home.

Did a storm just blow through? Although roofs are designed to resist wind loads common to your geographical location, even the strongest roof system has the potential to become structurally unsound given extreme winds and rain. To prevent the occurrence of further damage, homeowners are urged to contact a local roofing contractor for immediate inspection.

Unlike structural damage, interior and exterior roof damage can be seen at eye level, making it safe for you to inspect on your own. The best place to begin is in the attic – don’t forget a flashlight. Things to look for on the inside include sagging roof decking, water damage, dark spots and trails, and outside light peeking through.

Moving on to the exterior of your home, pay attention to such things as torn, cracked or missing tiles, loose materials around vents or chimneys, and damaged flashing. You should also look for signs of mold, rot or moisture. Be sure to check the roof’s drainage system to ensure the gutters are allowing water to properly exit the roof.

Materials Can Make All The Difference

Making the determination as to when you need a new roof in Denver also depends on your existing roofing material, as there are various materials that can be used, each with their own share of pros and cons. We also service commercial roofs in Denver.

Asphalt Shingles: Asphalt shingles are one of the most popular roofing materials available. They are available in two types: organic and fiberglass. Both of which are waterproof. Fiberglass, however, are more widely available. The greatest advantage to asphalt shingles is their cost: they will provide protection for 15 to 30 years for a relatively low upfront cost.

Wood Shingles: Wood shingles come in a variety of materials including cedar and pine. Wood shingles have an expected lifespan of 30 to 50 years. The downside to wood shingles is: They have poor fire ratings and they’re prone to mold and rot. In moist climates, you may notice the growth of moss.

Clay, Slate or Concrete Tiles: Clay and concrete tiles should never need replacing – at least not in your lifetime considering this type of roof has a lifespan of a hundred. Individual tiles, however, can break or crack making it necessary to have them replaced by a professional roofing contractor.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs are becoming a popular option for homeowners in areas prone to snowstorms. They are also becoming quite popular as they are environmentally friendly (they are often made from recycled materials) as well as being very durable. Metal is resistant to fire, mildew, insects, and rot. They typically have a lifespan of 50 plus years.

Roof Replacement: Starting Over

A new roof system is an important investment. There are plenty of reasons why you should not put off replacing an old or damaged roof. Keep in mind: Older roofs are more susceptible to structural damages. So even if you are unable to see any physical damage, you may want to still consider roof replacement if your existing roof is nearing its lifespan.

A strong, durable roof is one that keeps out moisture as well as hot and cold temperatures. Roof replacement may be more of a necessity than you might think, so slow down, and make the time to thoroughly inspect your roof. Or…contact a professional roofing contractor to inspect it. They will guide you in evaluating your available options.

Roofing 101

roofing 101

When replacing an old roof or building a home from scratch, it is important to understand the roofing jargon that to you may simply sound like something from a 007, or science fiction movie. In Roofing 101 we explain the basics of roofing shapes, materials, and vocabulary so that you can make the most informed decision when diving into any roofing project: whether repair or new roofing.

Roofing 101: Shapes

  • Gable
  • Hip
  • Mansard
  • Gambrel
  • Shed

Roofing 101: Materials

Asphalt Shingles: With more than 75% of all homes being built with asphalt shingles, these shingles are the most commonly used material in the United States. And for good reason, considering they are the least expensive option, and provide for the easiest installation.  Although their lifespan isn’t the best, they should last 15 to 30 years. Asphalt shingles are available in two types: organic and fiberglass.

Tile Roofs: Concrete and clay tiles are manufactured in a vast variety of colors, to compliment most any Mediterranean, European, Mission, and contemporary or ranch-style home. Tile roofs have the longest life expectancy of any other roofing material. Centuries old tile roofs are still enduring today. Tile roofs are built to withstand most anything Mother Nature throws at them and are Class A fire resistant.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs can be manufactured using a variety of materials, including copper, aluminum and stainless steel. They are commonly seen on bungalow, ranch, contemporary, and cottage style homes. Highly durable, and resistant to adverse weather, metal roofs are expected to last 50 years or more. Metal roofs are also endlessly recyclable; making them a viable choice for eco-friendly homeowners.

Roofing 101: Vocabulary

Coverage: The degree of weather protection offered by a roofing material: single, double or triple coverage.

Cricket: A built-up barrier to divert runoff around a chimney or at a transitional area.

Decking/Sheathing: The surface, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), to which roofing materials are applied.

Dormer: A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.

Drip Edge: L-shaped pieces of metal installed around the perimeter of a house to help prevent water from dripping behind the fascia boards or cap.

Eaves: Parts of a roof that project beyond or overhang the face at the lower edge of a sloped roof.

Exposure: Specifically, exposure to weather: the distance from the butt edge of one shingle to another.

Fascia: A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.

Fasteners: What holds the roofing material on top of the house (nails or screws).

Felt/Underlayment: A sheet of asphalt-saturated materials (often called tar paper) used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Fire Rating: System for classifying the fire resistances of various materials. Roofing materials are rated Class A, B or C. Class A materials, such as tile, have the highest resistance to fire originating outside the structure.

Flashing: Usually metal, this material is installed to prevent the infiltration of water into a transition, such as around chimneys and pipes.

Louvers: Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit (the underside of eaves) to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture. OSB: roof deck panels (4 feet by 8 feet) made of narrow bits of wood, installed lengthwise and crosswise in layers, and held together with a resin glue.

Peak: The very top area of the roof, usually covered with a ridge vet or ridge cap.

Penetrations: Objects that penetrate the roof’s deck, such as vents, pipes and chimneys.

Rake: The inclined edge of a pitched roof over an end wall.

Ridge Vent: A vent that runs the entire length of the roof, allowing air to escape.

Square: The amount of roofing material required to cover 10 square feet of roof surface.

Soffits: The finished underside of a sloped roof.

Transitions: Areas of the roof where the pitch/slope or angle changes.

Valley: An internal angle or water runway formed by the intersection of two slopes in a roof.

Is It Time For a New Roof?

Leaky Roof?

The roof is perhaps one of the most important parts of your home and knowing when to repair it is important. Roofing repair can be costly, so knowing when to repair or replace the roof can be a big decision for a family. A roof can last anywhere from 15 to 40 or more years.

The following are a few tips and guidelines to follow when making the decision about roof repairs:

  • 1. Missing or Cracked Shingles – If you notice this problem, it may be a sign that the tar holding shingles in place has worn out. At this stage, roofing repair instead of replacement might be a feasible option.
  • 2. Damp Spots in the Attic or Ceiling – If visible water spots are in the attic, it might be a sign that it is time for a new roof. Damp areas can also mean that the roof is nearing the end of its life.
  • 3. Buckling Shingles – Buckling can mean that new shingles might have been applied over old ones or that there is poor roof ventilation.
  • 4. Rotting Roof – Roof rotting happens when the roof mat absorbs the moisture from the air and the shingles disintegrate. This problem happens more in southern states.

Gutters, too, play a role in making a decision about your roofing needs. Paying attention to your gutters can prevent small problems from becoming bigger. Damaged or improperly installed gutters can allow water to get under the roof and lead to significant damage.

New Roofs Are The Best Roofs

Are you thinking about having a new roof installed, but are not sure if it’s worth the time or money? Well, getting a new roof installed is definitely a smart idea. Your roof is one of the most important parts of your home because it helps protect the inside from dirt, snow, wind, rain and other environmental factors. It is also relatively inexpensive to install a new roof. Here are the benefits of getting a new roof:

It Raises the Value of Your Home

A new rooftop will certainly raise the value of your home. It is one of the first aspects of your home seen by potential buyers, so it is important for it to look good. Potential buyers will see your home as newer and nicer with new shingles and a new gutter system installed.

It Will Reduce Frequency of Repairs

With a new roof, you can avoid costly roof repairs for some time. In fact, you likely will not have the need for a single repair for at least several years. In the long run, a new roof can save over constant repairs.

It Will Lower Your Energy Bill

If your roof is old and deteriorating, air can escape your home, which will cause your air conditioning to work harder. A new roof can eliminate this creating a more energy efficient living environment.

It Will Be Safer for Your Family Members

Some older roofs can actually be health hazards. Worn roof in need of new shingles and/or gutters can endanger your family’s health. Bacteria and mold has been known to grown in these old roofs, leading to potential allergy and respiratory problems.

As you can see, getting a new roof is completely worth the money. When you have a new roof installed by Jenesis Roofing, you will have the peace of mind of safety, comfort, and efficiency.

Asphalt vs. Tile Roofing

Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt shingles have been around for a long time. They are one of the two preferred type of roofing material in use throughout the world. For most climatic conditions in the United States asphalt shingle material is the most preferred. Though a growing number of consumers are choosing a shingle that is tile, made of cement or clay. While other materials are available, at this time, asphalt and tile are the preferred material for quality roof construction.

One reason for the growth in popularity of tile is how the design fits for homes of southwestern design. For that reason, all across the sun belt from California to Florida, homes with stucco walls often use cement or clay tile. The tile type of shingle allows the attic of a home to remain cooler than possible with an asphalt shingle. In turn, a cooler attic helps keep the main part of the home at a more comfortable temperature. In addition to the cement or clay tiles naturally helping keep a home cooler, the colors used are lighter in color, helping to reflect the heat.

Tile roof-material is considered to increase the value of a home. This is due to the fact that tile generally lasts much longer than asphalt shingles. Also, many tile manufacturers have a warranty for their tile shingle products for as long as fifty years.

The initial cost of tile roofing is usually more than asphalt shingles. Comparison of the cost over the expected life time of each type of roofing, however, shows tile is more cost effective over the long run.

Some companies point to possible breakage, causing a need for repair, with a tile shingle but the same type of weather conditions that can damage tile can destroy a roof that uses asphalt material. Asphalt roofing, in many climates, can require cleaning to remove moss and plant growth, the same is true for tile roofing, but the repair process is easier, less time consuming, and therefore less costly.

Tile Roofing

As is the case with any product, the quality of the workers performing installation makes a big difference. With either product, a bad installation can result in significant expense in the future. Some asphalt shingles are now made in a laminated manner, bringing the cost of an asphalt shingle closer to that of cement or clay tile. Properly installed both types of shingles, asphalt or tile, can last up to a half century, which is a very long time.

There is a wider range of colors and textures available from asphalt roofing, which is one contributor to the current continued preference for asphalt by home owners. Both types of shingles can require repair with replacement of the damaged shingles, but asphalt shingles can sometimes avoid repair by using patches, instead of needing replacement.

In the end, it comes down to personal preference as to which type of material is selected. It appears, for the greater Denver metro area anyway, these two types of shingle material will remain the top choices of contractors and home buyers for some time to come.

Jenesis Roofing is your local leader for all of your roofing needs. Call today for a free estimate on your new roof!

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