Out with the Old and In with the New Roof

 

Year after year, Americans resolve to exercise more often, manage their time better and/or pad their savings accounts. New Year’s resolutions are certainly a great way to make a positive change (or two) in your life!

Another good New Year’s resolution? Vowing to make some home improvements – whether minor or major – in the coming year. One place to start is your roof; especially if any of following conditions apply to your existing roofing system:

  • Moss growth
  • Dark streaks or stains
  • Missing or cracked shingles
  • Bald spots where granules are missing
  • Curled shingle edges or cupped shingle tabs
  • Your roof is at least 20 years old; while many shingles today are produced for durability, certain factors can lead to premature roof failure, including (but not limited to) inadequate ventilation and storm damage.

A new roof, professionally installed in either the fall or spring – barring emergency replacement – can help add curb appeal and will increase the perceived value of your home. This may be especially helpful if you intend to sell your Colorado residence in the foreseeable future. Additionally, return on investment (ROI) is right up there with major remodeling projects. such as renovating a kitchen or bath.

Would you like to receive more information on the different types of roofing materials available and the benefits of each? Contact the experts at Jenesis Roofing and receive a free roofing estimate. You can call us at (303) 789-1505 or find us at www.jenesisroofing.com.

Note: This post has been updated for 2018; the original blog can be found here.

How to Choose Roofing System Color

roofing system color

Whether using metal, slate or asphalt shingles, a properly installed roofing system can provide homeowners with years of protection from the elements. Aside from that, a new roofing system offers versatility, allowing you to pick from a wide variety of unique colors and styles to upgrade your home’s curb appeal.

While it’s impossible to give a hard-and-fast rule on how to choose a roofing system color – everyone has a their own sense of style and taste – it’s important to take the following three tips into consideration. Remember, for most homeowners, installing a roofing system is a once in a lifetime decision!

Match your home’s architectural design

The color you choose for your roof should complement your home’s architectural design, creating a unified, balanced look. Once you’ve gathered some roofing system color samples, look at them against your home during different times of the day to make sure you like that color when sun is at its most intense (typically between the hours of 10 AM and 4 PM), as well as when the sun sets. This is especially important if your home was built using brick or stone.

Consider your neighborhood

One of the best ways to choose a color for your new roof is to drive around your neighborhood. Check out the different color combinations of roof, brick / siding, and trim colors that your neighbors have tried. Make a list of the ones you like. Once you’ve narrowed down your option, contact your homeowners association (if applicable) for approval, prior to making a final decision.

Go for energy efficiency

To potentially reduce your monthly energy bills, choose a roofing system that is light in color. Colors, such as tan, gray, cream, and white reflect and emit the sun’s heat back to the sky, rather than absorbing and transferring it into your home. [Source: Cool Roof Rating Council]

A light-colored roof may benefit you by:

  • Increasing comfort at home by resisting heat
  • Cutting energy costs by reducing the need for air conditioning
  • Decreasing roof maintenance costs, thus increasing the longevity of your roof

Roof Replacement Tips

roof replacement

Like having a warm, cozy, leak-free home?

Then a solid roof over your head is mandatory. After all, it protects your biggest investment – your home. If roof replacement is in your future, here are some tips to help you make the best, most informed decision.

Take the time to learn about different materials. Your material options include asphalt shingles, clay and concrete tiles, metal, slate, wood shingles and shake, as well as synthetic roofing products. Each material has its share of pros and cons. For example, clay and concrete tiles will last 40 to 50 years, versus asphalt shingles 20 to 25 years. It’s important to discuss these options with your roofing contractor.

Check weather ratings. There are a lot of terms that can be used to describe Colorado but “boring” certainly isn’t one of them. From major snowstorms and blizzards, to tornadoes and scoring Summers, Colorado’s weather can go to the extreme. That is why it’s important to check wind and weather related ratings when choosing a material since not all materials are created equal.

Choose a style that will complement your home. As previously mentioned, an asphalt roof can last between 20 and 25 years (and other materials like metal can last 50 or more years), so it’s important to pick one that maximizes your curb appeal. You will also want to make sure the material, color, and style is acceptable with your HOA (if applicable).

Strip away the old. Laying new shingles over old shingles is almost always a bad idea. Not only does this reduce the life of the new shingle, but it also adds extra weight to the roof decking, permits leaks and ice damming, and may void the manufacturers warranty. Only after a tear-off can the roof be properly inspected for rot, mold, and other damage.

Go top shelf. For added peace-of-mind, buy high-quality products, with the longest available warranty. You’ll also want to opt for galvanized sheet metal or copper flashing over aluminum for durability. Remember: Flashing protects your home from leaks by sealing the joints where two roof panels or a wall meets.

Ask questions. Before hiring a roofing company, it is vital that you ask certain questions about their location, insurance/bonding, and licensing. Equally important, ask for credentials, reviews and references. This will provide you with a good ideas of the work you can expect.

In Need of Roof Replacement?

At Jenesis Roofing Inc., we provide a variety of services to Colorado residents, including roof repairs, roof replacement, new roof installation, and preventative maintenance. Contact us to learn more at (303) 789-1505. We provide free estimates! Also, for a limited time only, free solar powered roof mounted attic vents with full roof replacement.

Extend Roof Life with These Tips

extend roof life

A new roof is no small investment – $20,142 on average for fiberglass asphalt shingles, according to Remodeling magazine’s annual Cost vs. Value Report, now in its fourteenth year. That is not to say, however, that it is without its rewards. A new roof can net you a return on investment of $14,446 or 71.7%.

If replacement is your ultimate goal, you may want to consider installing either a metal roof or tile roof, as they can last twice as long. Preventative maintenance measures, such as those that follow, will extend roof life and keep you from having to replace it prematurely. Here’s what you need to do to extend roof life.

Catch Problems Early

One of the best preventative maintenance measures you can do to extend roof life luckily costs no money at all. You should routinely look for any obvious signs of damage – especially after every big wind, rain, hail or snow storm. Here’s what you should train yourself to look for:

  • Moss growth
  • Torn, cracked, or missing shingles
  • Detached gutters and downspouts
  • Damaged flashing around vents, chimneys, skylights, and other openings

Clean the Gutters

A gutter clogged with leaves, sticks, and other debris can cause the roof’s raters or sheathing to rot. Fixing that type of damage can be costly, but you can avoid it by thoroughly cleaning your gutters each fall and spring, or as needed. You can either hire someone to clean your gutters or do it yourself.

Trim Overhanging Branches

Trimming any trees in close proximity to your home goes a long way towards keeping leaves off your roof, and out of your gutters, as well as keeping your roof free from damage. Overhanging branches can cause abrasion, which can later lead to damaged shingles, especially in high winds. Branches should be kept 10 feet away from your roof.

Have the Roof Professionally Inspected

Homeowners should have their roof professionally inspected annually. Why? Even the most durable roof can have some weaknesses or become damaged due to extreme weather conditions, such as, wind, rain, snow and hail. A professional can provide you with an accurate assessment on the roof’s condition. They will:

  • Perform a thorough interior roof inspection.
  • Perform a thorough exterior roof inspection.
  • Create a course of action, if any repairs are required.
  • Provide a written detailed estimate with recommended solutions.

Roofing 101

roofing 101

When replacing an old roof or building a home from scratch, it is important to understand the roofing jargon that to you may simply sound like something from a 007, or science fiction movie. In Roofing 101 we explain the basics of roofing shapes, materials, and vocabulary so that you can make the most informed decision when diving into any roofing project: whether repair or new roofing.

Roofing 101: Shapes

  • Gable
  • Hip
  • Mansard
  • Gambrel
  • Shed

Roofing 101: Materials

Asphalt Shingles: With more than 75% of all homes being built with asphalt shingles, these shingles are the most commonly used material in the United States. And for good reason, considering they are the least expensive option, and provide for the easiest installation.  Although their lifespan isn’t the best, they should last 15 to 30 years. Asphalt shingles are available in two types: organic and fiberglass.

Tile Roofs: Concrete and clay tiles are manufactured in a vast variety of colors, to compliment most any Mediterranean, European, Mission, and contemporary or ranch-style home. Tile roofs have the longest life expectancy of any other roofing material. Centuries old tile roofs are still enduring today. Tile roofs are built to withstand most anything Mother Nature throws at them and are Class A fire resistant.

Metal Roofs: Metal roofs can be manufactured using a variety of materials, including copper, aluminum and stainless steel. They are commonly seen on bungalow, ranch, contemporary, and cottage style homes. Highly durable, and resistant to adverse weather, metal roofs are expected to last 50 years or more. Metal roofs are also endlessly recyclable; making them a viable choice for eco-friendly homeowners.

Roofing 101: Vocabulary

Coverage: The degree of weather protection offered by a roofing material: single, double or triple coverage.

Cricket: A built-up barrier to divert runoff around a chimney or at a transitional area.

Decking/Sheathing: The surface, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), to which roofing materials are applied.

Dormer: A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.

Drip Edge: L-shaped pieces of metal installed around the perimeter of a house to help prevent water from dripping behind the fascia boards or cap.

Eaves: Parts of a roof that project beyond or overhang the face at the lower edge of a sloped roof.

Exposure: Specifically, exposure to weather: the distance from the butt edge of one shingle to another.

Fascia: A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.

Fasteners: What holds the roofing material on top of the house (nails or screws).

Felt/Underlayment: A sheet of asphalt-saturated materials (often called tar paper) used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Fire Rating: System for classifying the fire resistances of various materials. Roofing materials are rated Class A, B or C. Class A materials, such as tile, have the highest resistance to fire originating outside the structure.

Flashing: Usually metal, this material is installed to prevent the infiltration of water into a transition, such as around chimneys and pipes.

Louvers: Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit (the underside of eaves) to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture. OSB: roof deck panels (4 feet by 8 feet) made of narrow bits of wood, installed lengthwise and crosswise in layers, and held together with a resin glue.

Peak: The very top area of the roof, usually covered with a ridge vet or ridge cap.

Penetrations: Objects that penetrate the roof’s deck, such as vents, pipes and chimneys.

Rake: The inclined edge of a pitched roof over an end wall.

Ridge Vent: A vent that runs the entire length of the roof, allowing air to escape.

Square: The amount of roofing material required to cover 10 square feet of roof surface.

Soffits: The finished underside of a sloped roof.

Transitions: Areas of the roof where the pitch/slope or angle changes.

Valley: An internal angle or water runway formed by the intersection of two slopes in a roof.

The Many Benefits of a Metal Roof

metal roof

Are you interested in making your home more energy efficient, adding a major design element that is both aesthetically pleasing and fire resistant, and never having to worry about replacing your roof again? Then you will want to consider a metal roof. Properly installed, a metal roof will likely last a lifetime, and require minimal maintenance. Here are just some of the advantages of a metal roof.

Longevity: As mentioned previously, a properly installed metal roof will likely last a lifetime, and require minimal maintenance. Metal is resistant to fire, mildew, insects, and rot. It is also said to withstand the unpredictable nature of Mother Nature – be it heavy rainstorms, hailstorms, or snow. In a nut shell, a metal roof can make your home safe, even in the harshest environment.

Energy Efficiency: As reported by the Cool Metal Roofing Coalition and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, installation of reflective metal roofing can save you up to 20% in heating and cooling costs. Light-colored roofing materials can also make your home 50 to 60 degrees cooler in the summer. This allows you to cut back on air conditioning costs; thus saving you money.

Environmentally-friendly: Unmatched longevity, superior energy saving features, and endless recyclability make metal roofs the perfect choice for homeowners looking for environmentally-friendly products. Many metal roofs contain up to 40% recycled sheets, while the alloy, be it tin, aluminum, copper or galvanized steel is 100% recyclable. As a result of this recyclability, and their longevity, metal is rarely seen in landfills.

Fire Resistance: Metal is noncombustible. Because of this, metal is given a Class A fire resistant rating, which is the highest rating given in accordance with UL 790 standardized test methods. If a metal roof is being directly installed over another roofing material, which is every so often the case, the class of fire resistance may be lower depending on the type of material.

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